thesecretdiaryofjake:

Gays, we need to have a talk. Some people out there that need a good lesson in reality and expectations. Let me tell you a little story…

When in Berlin I met a fellow Australian guy while traveling. I asked him about his travels and discovered that he recently moved countries too. Conversation…

298 notes

tastefullyoffensive:

Day 12: They still suspect nothing. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

Day 12: They still suspect nothing. [via]

6,851 notes

mmoboys:

Metal Gear: Gray Fox

mmoboys:

Metal Gear: Gray Fox

40 notes

ursulatheseabitchh:

ohsoswiftly:

Reacting to Blue Ivy

Lorde looks like an alien who is desperately trying to replicate human emotion so her cover isn’t blown.

109,830 notes

thejamesboyle:

Hahahahahahahaha this makes me laugh every time

thejamesboyle:

Hahahahahahahaha this makes me laugh every time

(Source: morepayne)

105,375 notes

Nicamap, Edición 3

Tercera edición de los mapas turísticos Nicamap, para Vapues Tours.
MN003-1
MN003-2 MN003-3

View On WordPress

skunkbear:

Here’s an interesting study: psychologists at the University of York wanted to investigate first impressions. They had people rate 1000 images of faces on different social traits (this person looks more approachable, that one looks less dominant) and also mapped “65 physical attributes, such as eyebrow width, mouth area, and cheekbone position” … even head angle!

Then, with some statistical analysis, they were able to show how different physical traits influence our first impressions. We obviously use physical cues to determine how attractive someone is, but according to the study those same cues influence what we think about their personalities.

These cartoon faces are based on the study - the researchers took their objective measurements of various facial features and optimized them for certain traits. Obviously we can’t control a lot about our faces, but the study does suggest that if you want to appear more approachable, smiling really big and tilting your head to the side (at a 10.21 degree angle to be precise) might help.

Source: Richard J. W. Vernon, Clare A. M. Sutherland, Andrew W. Young, and Tom Hartley, Department of Psychology, University of York

1,213 notes